European Journal of Environment and Public Health

Health and Telework: New Challenges after COVID-19 Pandemic
Giuseppe Buomprisco 1 * , Serafino Ricci 1, Roberto Perri 1, Simone De Sio 1
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1 R.U. of Occupational Medicine, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 336 - 00161, Rome, ITALY
* Corresponding Author
Review Article

European Journal of Environment and Public Health, 2021 - Volume 5 Issue 2, Article No: em0073
https://doi.org/10.21601/ejeph/9705

Published Online: 13 Feb 2021

Views: 2497 | Downloads: 5417

How to cite this article
APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Buomprisco et al., 2021)
Reference: Buomprisco, G., Ricci, S., Perri, R., & De Sio, S. (2021). Health and Telework: New Challenges after COVID-19 Pandemic. European Journal of Environment and Public Health, 5(2), em0073. https://doi.org/10.21601/ejeph/9705
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Buomprisco G, Ricci S, Perri R, De Sio S. Health and Telework: New Challenges after COVID-19 Pandemic. EUROPEAN J ENV PUBLI. 2021;5(2):em0073. https://doi.org/10.21601/ejeph/9705
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Buomprisco G, Ricci S, Perri R, De Sio S. Health and Telework: New Challenges after COVID-19 Pandemic. EUROPEAN J ENV PUBLI. 2021;5(2), em0073. https://doi.org/10.21601/ejeph/9705
Chicago
In-text citation: (Buomprisco et al., 2021)
Reference: Buomprisco, Giuseppe, Serafino Ricci, Roberto Perri, and Simone De Sio. "Health and Telework: New Challenges after COVID-19 Pandemic". European Journal of Environment and Public Health 2021 5 no. 2 (2021): em0073. https://doi.org/10.21601/ejeph/9705
Harvard
In-text citation: (Buomprisco et al., 2021)
Reference: Buomprisco, G., Ricci, S., Perri, R., and De Sio, S. (2021). Health and Telework: New Challenges after COVID-19 Pandemic. European Journal of Environment and Public Health, 5(2), em0073. https://doi.org/10.21601/ejeph/9705
MLA
In-text citation: (Buomprisco et al., 2021)
Reference: Buomprisco, Giuseppe et al. "Health and Telework: New Challenges after COVID-19 Pandemic". European Journal of Environment and Public Health, vol. 5, no. 2, 2021, em0073. https://doi.org/10.21601/ejeph/9705
ABSTRACT
The COVID-19 pandemic represented a big challenge not only for the health systems but also for the working world that has been characterized by the spread of telework. The aim of this review is to resume the knowledge about the effects of telework on the health and safety of teleworkers, and to point out these implications in the light of the growing development and diffusion of it after COVID-19 pandemic. A literature research on the main scientific research engines (Pubmed, Scopus, Google Scholar, Cochrane Review) has been performed. No restrictions were applied for language or publication type. All the articles not concerned with the health effects of telework have been excluded. That kind of work arrangement can take advantages to both employers and workers by improving productivity and work-life balance. However, it has some potential disadvantages, represented by the possible negative implications on worker’s health. The main hazards for the health of teleworkers are: the unavailability of ergonomic work equipment and a dedicated working area, the risk of overwork, and psychosocial implications of working from home. Performing telework can affect both physical and psychosocial health but some authors also described potential health benefits.
KEYWORDS
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