European Journal of Environment and Public Health

An Investigation into Long-acting Reversible Contraception: Use, Awareness, and Associated Factors
Mojgan Zendehdel 1, Shayesteh Jahanfar 2 * , Zainab Hamzehgardeshi 3 4, Ensiyeh Fooladi 5
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1 Reproductive and Sexual Health Research Centre, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Mazandaran, IRAN
2 School of Health Sciences, Central Michigan University, Health Professions Building 2242, Mount Pleasant, MI, 48859, USA
3 Sexual and Reproductive Health Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, IRAN
4 Associate Professor, Department of Reproductive Health and Midwifery, Nasibeh Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, IRAN
5 Women’s Health Research Program, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
* Corresponding Author
Research Article

European Journal of Environment and Public Health, 2020 - Volume 4 Issue 2, Article No: em0039
https://doi.org/10.29333/ejeph/7837

Published Online: 17 Mar 2020

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How to cite this article
APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Zendehdel et al., 2020)
Reference: Zendehdel, M., Jahanfar, S., Hamzehgardeshi, Z., & Fooladi, E. (2020). An Investigation into Long-acting Reversible Contraception: Use, Awareness, and Associated Factors. European Journal of Environment and Public Health, 4(2), em0039. https://doi.org/10.29333/ejeph/7837
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Zendehdel M, Jahanfar S, Hamzehgardeshi Z, Fooladi E. An Investigation into Long-acting Reversible Contraception: Use, Awareness, and Associated Factors. EUROPEAN J ENV PUBLI. 2020;4(2):em0039. https://doi.org/10.29333/ejeph/7837
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Zendehdel M, Jahanfar S, Hamzehgardeshi Z, Fooladi E. An Investigation into Long-acting Reversible Contraception: Use, Awareness, and Associated Factors. EUROPEAN J ENV PUBLI. 2020;4(2), em0039. https://doi.org/10.29333/ejeph/7837
Chicago
In-text citation: (Zendehdel et al., 2020)
Reference: Zendehdel, Mojgan, Shayesteh Jahanfar, Zainab Hamzehgardeshi, and Ensiyeh Fooladi. "An Investigation into Long-acting Reversible Contraception: Use, Awareness, and Associated Factors". European Journal of Environment and Public Health 2020 4 no. 2 (2020): em0039. https://doi.org/10.29333/ejeph/7837
Harvard
In-text citation: (Zendehdel et al., 2020)
Reference: Zendehdel, M., Jahanfar, S., Hamzehgardeshi, Z., and Fooladi, E. (2020). An Investigation into Long-acting Reversible Contraception: Use, Awareness, and Associated Factors. European Journal of Environment and Public Health, 4(2), em0039. https://doi.org/10.29333/ejeph/7837
MLA
In-text citation: (Zendehdel et al., 2020)
Reference: Zendehdel, Mojgan et al. "An Investigation into Long-acting Reversible Contraception: Use, Awareness, and Associated Factors". European Journal of Environment and Public Health, vol. 4, no. 2, 2020, em0039. https://doi.org/10.29333/ejeph/7837
ABSTRACT
Objectives: We aimed to investigate the prevalence, awareness, perceived reliability, and factors associated with the use of long-acting reversible contraception among reproductive-aged, married women and men in Iran.
Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 1520 men and women between 15-49 years of age who attended public health centers in Tehran were surveyed.
Results: About 85% of the respondents reported that they were already familiar with intrauterine contraception and 61.9% with Medroxyprogesterone Acetate. The majority of women respondents had not considered IUDs (57.2%) or DMPA (59.1%) as reliable methods. As for men, IUDs (53.8%) or DMPA (39.8%) were considered as reliable methods of contraception. Moreover, a higher number of women thought it was better to refrain from using IUDs (60.3%) or DMPA (61.5%) than men [IUDs (53.4%) or DMPA (40.2%)]. Those who in the younger age group (18-40 years old), had younger partners (18-40 years old), had education beyond a high school diploma and had no history of unwanted pregnancy (58%) were less likely to use LARC.
Conclusions: Men and women are familiar with LARC (Long-acting reversible contraception) methods, but few believe that these methods are reliable. Demonstration of the performance of long-term methods by health personnel will increase the belief and trust of women and men in longer-lasting ways of contraception.
KEYWORDS
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